Thousands left without speed or mobile service in Prince Edward Island after nationwide Rogers outage

CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI “The first two times the debit machine didn’t work, Parker Snow thought it might just be a problem with Tim Hortons.

After getting up at 5:30 a.m. on July 8, he tried to stop for coffee and a bagel in Charlottetown before heading to work in Summerside.

He didn’t have cash, so he decided to try another debit machine, this time at McDonalds. If that didn’t work, he was going to be late for work – and hungry.

It did not work.

No one knew what was wrong at such an early hour, but Snow would soon discover he was one of thousands left behind during a Rogers network outage.

He finally got cash from an ATM in downtown Summerside and returned to work 35 minutes late, but fed and ready to work.

It was a stressful morning, realizing he was getting later and later, but Snow says he feels lucky to have a flexible employer.

“They absolutely didn’t need me in the morning, which again a lot of other people probably can’t say. … A lot of people are probably very unhappy this morning.

Snow isn’t a Rogers mobile customer, but neither was he surprised to see the outage extend to areas like Interac debit service.

“With the kind of way we as a country rely on private infrastructure in general and this one in particular, it’s just emblematic of a larger problem.”

Charlottetown resident Parker Snow says the Rogers outage reflects larger problems with public <a class=services that rely on private infrastructure. – Logan MacLean • The Guardian – Logan MacLean” data-enhance=”true” data-src=”https://news.google.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/7/8/strapped-for-cash-thousands-left-without-debit-mobile-service_1B6IvOw.jpg?cs=srgb&fit=clip&h=700&w=847&auto=enhance%2Ccompress%2Cformat” data-srcset=”https://news.google.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/7/8/strapped-for-cash-thousands-left-without-debit-mobile-service_1B6IvOw.jpg?fit=clip&h=700&w=847&auto=compress,https://news.google.com/https://news.google.com/format,https://news.google.com/enhance 847w, https://news.google.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/7/8/strapped-for-cash-thousands-left-without-debit-mobile-service_1B6IvOw.jpg?fit=clip&h=1400&w=1694&auto=compress,https://news.google.com/https://news.google.com/format,https://news.google.com/enhance 1694w” style=”height: auto; width: auto;”/>
Charlottetown resident Parker Snow says the Rogers outage reflects larger problems with public services that rely on private infrastructure. – Logan MacLean • The Guardian – Logan MacLean

social media

After a quiet morning from Rogers, the company finally addressed the issue on its social media accounts around noon on July 8. As of 5 p.m., service was still unavailable.

“We are aware of the issues currently affecting our networks, and our teams are fully committed to resolving the issue as soon as possible,” reads a message on Facebook.

Prince Edward Island businesses have also notified their customers on social media.

The Provincial Credit Union posted on Facebook to say there was a problem with Interac, but customers could still use their ATMs and in-branch services.

“This is a nationwide issue and system vendors are working to resolve it as quickly as possible.”

“It’s not new. These are very old problems that are sold again and again on solutions that do not work.

Charlottetown resident Parker Snow

Vicki Tse, senior communications officer for the Department of Justice and Public Safety, said the province’s 911 service continued to operate during cellular outages.

“There is a CRTC-mandated guarantee for all telecommunications providers to ensure that anyone who needs to call 911 will do so through another wireless service provider.”


Chronology of events :

• Rogers customers across Canada woke up to service outages on July 8th.

• The outage affected cell phones, Internet and Interac (debit) banking services.

• Around noon, Rogers posted on social media accounts to say he was aware of the issues.

Source: Previous SaltWire reports


Deborah Walsh, who works at the Cavendish Tourist Mart, spoke with SaltWire Network on the morning of July 8.

Walsh said customers have been patient so far, but most people are no longer carrying cash.

“It’s kind of confusing on both sides, with the liquor agency and the grocery store.”

Looking ahead, Snow called for a different approach to utilities to avoid disruption in the future.

“It’s not new. These are very old problems that are sold again and again on solutions that do not work.


Logan MacLean is a reporter for SaltWire Network

[email protected]

@loganmaclean94

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